How to write a photographers artist statement

A Guest Post by Chris Folsom. It is an incredibly difficult task to describe your own work without sounding arrogant or self-absorbed. Worse yet, if your images span a variety of subjects and styles as mine often totrying to sum up the collection in a paragraph or two may seem impossible.

How to write a photographers artist statement

how to write a photographers artist statement

Feel free to use my work as a model for yours. A clearer understanding of myself and of my world allow me to explore fragments of life as an abstract form, and also to interact with people I would otherwise not be able to engage with.

I make pictures that call attention to things that other people overlook. This exploration of the overlooked helps me engage more deeply with where I am in space and time.

My goal is to make photographs that draw viewers into the now. A focus on details keeps us in the present, it stops us from fretting on the future or regretting the past. My photographs are like a physical meditation. I seek the unknown and I look for the light within the shadows, the stories that are not at first obvious and the uncommon in the common.

I photograph people in their environments because I am curious of what lays behind their eyes, where they have been and where they hope to go. My photography evokes the passage of time.

KNOW YOUR AUDIENCE

I use slow shutter speeds and double exposures to explore the nuances of movement and the modulation of time as it passes from past to present to future.

Recently I have begun to work with landscapes, attempting to illustrate abstract, evocative scenery as a motif to epitomize the idea of imagined space, a reminder that what I create through the viewfinder is only real to me. I enjoy finding photographs that capture candid moments.

I photograph people in their natural environment because I want to preserve a moment in time. Recently I have focused on portraits that capture mood through light and composition.

Strangely, colour has appeared in my work, slowly and without intention, concealing the black and white imagery of my past. This colour conjures images of my favourite foods — mangoes, chocolate and spicy masala chai, and surprises me. Gone with the black and white is my concern with documenting a story, rather I find myself interested in the results of immersing myself in the story and recording my own reactions and actions to my world.

The photographs of Faces and Places come from that immersion. I hope to bottle up happy moments in my photographs to save for later. Perhaps unsurprisingly, these photos reference memories of home and family.

This collection of work comes from my desire to preserve important those beautiful moments in my life. Equal Opportunity Notice The Issaquah School District complies with all applicable federal and state rules and regulations and does not discriminate on the basis of sex, race, creed, religion, color, national origin, age, honorably discharged veteran or military status, sexual orientation including gender expression or identity, the presence of any sensory, mental or physical disability, or the use of a trained dog guide or service animal by a person with a disability in its programs and activities, or employment related matters, and provides equal access to the Boy Scouts and other designated youth groups.

The following employees are designated to handle questions and complaints of alleged discrimination:Artist Statement. Photography is an exploration for me, a quest to capture elements of the abstract in nature. Before taking a photograph, I spend extended periods of time getting to know the natural light, colors, shapes, textures and motion in a defined geographical area — a short stretch of beach, a tidal pool, a salt marsh.

A s a professional artist, you need to have more than your work to get around in the art world. Along with your portfolio, you should have an artist statement available at a moment’s notice.

An artist statement should be considered just as important as your works. Why Writing an Artist Statement Makes Our Photography More Powerful For most photographers, making images of a subject we’re passionate about is the easy part.

It’s selecting the best images and sequencing them that’s challenging. An artists statement is a short document written by the artist which provides a window into the artists world.

It offers insight into a single piece or an entire body of work and by describing the artists creative process, philosophy, vision, and passion.

A good artist statement works towards this end, and the most important ingredient of a good statement is its language. WRITE YOUR STATEMENT IN LANGUAGE THAT ANYONE CAN UNDERSTAND, not language that you understand, not language that you and your friends understand, not language that you learn in art school, but everyday .

ELL Adaptation. I really liked this artist statement by Elisa Paloschil, so I used it as a form to build my artist statement ashio-midori.com free to use my work as a model for yours. “I use photography as a means of self-expression – I make pictures for myself, to identify with hidden qualities of my character, to better understand my reality, and to express my .

4 Ways to Write an Artist Statement - wikiHow